Native plants for wetlands, fields or forests and an eclectic mix of other botanic delights

Asimina triloba

Photo Credit:
Stan Kollar
Photo Credit:
Stan Kollar
Status
In Stock
Pawpaw
Interesting Maroon Flowers and Fruits that taste like pineapple/bananas
Mature Size:
' Height /
' Spread
Expected Size:
20'
/
15'
Light Preference:
Sun to Shade
Soil Preference:
Moist (Mesic)
Price:
$16.50/1 gal. (12" - 16"), $20.00 - $24.50/2 gal.; Some larger.

Asimina triloba, the Pawpaw, Paw-paw, or Common Pawpaw, is in the same plant family (the Annonaceae) as the custard-apple, cherimoya, sweetsop, ylang-ylang and soursop. The pawpaw is native to the Eastern, Southern, and Midwestern United States and adjacent southernmost Ontario, Canada, from New York west to eastern Nebraska, and south to northern Florida and eastern Texas. The pawpaw is a patch-forming (clonal) understory tree found in well-drained, deep, fertile bottom-land and hilly upland habitat, with large, simple leaves and the largest edible fruit indigenous to the United States.

Asimina triloba is a large shrub or small tree growing to a height of 35 feet (11 m) (rarely to 45 feet or 14 m) with a trunks 8-12 inches (20–30 cm) or more in diameter. The large leaves of pawpaw trees are clustered symmetrically at the ends of the branches, giving a distinctive imbricated appearance to the tree's foliage.

The leaves are simple, alternate and spirally arranged, entire, deciduous, obovate-lanceolate, 10-12 inches (25–30 cm) long, 4-5 inches (10–13 cm) broad, and wedge-shaped at the base, with an acute apex and an entire margin, with the midrib and primary veins prominent. The petioles are short and stout, with a prominent adaxial groove. Stipules are lacking.  When bruised, the leaves have a disagreeable odor similar to a green bell pepper. In autumn the leaves are a rusty yellow, which make spotting pawpaw groves possible from a long distance.

Pawpaw flowers are bisexual and perfect (all flower parts present), about 1-2 inches (3–5 cm) across, rich red-purple or maroon when mature, with three sepals and six petals. They are borne singly on stout, hairy, axillary peduncles. The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as or slightly before the new leaves appear, and have a faint fetid or yeasty smell.

The fruit of the pawpaw is a large, yellowish-green to brown berry, 2–6 in (5–16 cm) long and 1–3 in (3–7 cm) broad, weighing from 0.7–18 oz (20–500 g), containing several brown seeds 1/2 to 1 in (15–25 mm) in diameter embedded in the soft, edible fruit pulp that tastes like a cross between bananas and pineapple, but the seeds are very large. The conspicuous fruits begin developing after the plants flower; they are initially green, maturing by September or October to yellow or brown. When mature, the heavy fruits can bend the branches down.

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Information

Prices listed are subject to change, based upon size change and availability.

We are a small local nursery with limited shipping capability. We will do our best to ship smaller material (usually 1 or 2 gallon), although we can sometimes ship larger plants with the pots removed.

We have some species that are not listed, as we have too few of them to make a full listing plausible. You can always inquire.

We will consider contract growing an order with appropriate advance notice and availability of seed, cuttings or lining out stock.

Winter Business Hours
Monday
By Appointment
Tuesday
By Appointment
Wednesday
By Appointment
Thursday
By Appointment
Friday
By Appointment
Saturday
By Appointment
Sunday
By Appointment
Kollar Nursery | 5200 West Heaps Road, Pylesville, MD 21132 | 410.836.0500
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